Posts Tagged ‘Mohammad’

Article from DAWN

October 3rd, 2015

SIALKOT: A woman, married for three weeks, died from acid consumption at the Daska Civil Hospital on Monday.

According to the City Daska police, 25-year-old Takreem Bibi, of neighbourhood Mughalpura, was brought to the hospital by her neighbours as her in-laws had forced her to swallow acid. Doctors said she died of internal injuries caused by acid intake.

Takreem was married to Imran Mughal about three weeks ago. Police said the woman was frequently beaten up by her in-laws for not arranging a good range of dowry.

Police said the in-laws fled the house.

This is the second incident in five days in Daska where a woman was killed over the dowry issue.

Earlier, Aneeba Shehzadi, 26, was allegedly poisoned to death by her husband Asadullah in village Behaaripur-Motra on Sept 24. She had died at the Daska Civil Hospital.

Police have yet to trace Asad and his family.

HONOUR KILLINGS: A local landlord and his two wives were shot dead on Monday allegedly by the family of his second wife for honour in village Dholleywali-Daska.

Daska Saddar police said Mushtaq Ghuman had three daughters from his first wife, Sajeela Firdous. Two years ago, Bahawalpur-based Gul Naz eloped with him and they both held a court marriage.

Gul Naz’s family developed a grudge against Gul Naz and Ghuman and would hurl threats on them.

On Monday, Gul Naz’s father Tariq, uncle Zia and nephew Khurram stormed Ghuman’s house in Dholleywali and shot dead Ghuman, Sajeela and Gul Naz. They fled the house on a motorcycle.

Daska Saddar police registered a triple murder case against Tariq, Zia and Khurram on the report of Mushtaq’s brother Ehsanullah.

Police shifted the bodies to Daska Civil Hospital for autopsy.

Superintendent of Police Irfan Tariq Khan said a special police team, led by inspector Muhammad Akhtar Cheema, was raiding places to arrest the suspects.

Also, in the Hajipura locality of Daska, 12-year-old Ameer Muaviya was gunned down at the home of his uncle Muhammad Ashfaq Rehmani.

Daska City police registered a case.

Published in Dawn September 29th, 2015

Celebrating Universal Children Day in collaboration with GEP, US AID, Aurat Foundation, ZCECH Republic, SAHIL, GLOBAL FUND FOR CHILDREN

January 16th, 2014

Mrs Shazia, ASF Pakistan NCRU coordinator, presenting Meri Ifazat to a school in Islamabad.

Working on inclusiveness, children meeting others to learn how to be safe, in a child friendly manner.

Together, we can: power to children!

ASF-Pakistan new collaboration with Aus Aid

December 13th, 2012

11 December 2012

Australia supports Human Rights NGOs in Pakistan

To mark International Human Rights Day, Australian High Commissioner Peter Heyward announced major human rights funding grants to the Acid Survivors Foundation and the Jinnah Institute under Australia’s Human Rights Grants Scheme.

Both groups will receive A$100,000 (PKR10 million) towards their important projects.

Australia supports civil society organisations and human rights institutions in 126 countries including Pakistan through the Human Rights Grants Scheme. In Pakistan, past projects supported by the scheme include interfaith harmony, enhanced religious understanding, child rights and awareness about forced marriages.

Mr Heyward commended the excellent work of the Acid Survivors Foundation and the Jinnah Institute in the field of human rights.

“These organisations are a testament to the vibrancy of civil society in Pakistan and I particularly admire the dedication these groups have to eliminating violence against women and promoting strong human rights principles throughout the country and the region.”

He said the Acid Survivors Foundation has been working tirelessly to provide care and rehabilitation to acid-attack victims. The new funding will assist the Foundation to help victims seek legal recourse by ensuring that there is nation-wide awareness and implementation of the recent legislative changes against acid-based violence.

The Australian High Commission is also supporting the Jinnah Institute in its efforts to advocate for the inclusion of positive human rights messages and awareness of internationally accepted human rights standards in middle and high school curricula.

The High Commissioner took the opportunity to congratulate Pakistan on its recent election to the UN Human Rights Council and hoped Australia and Pakistan would continue their productive relationship and dialogue at the UN Security Council next year when Australia took up its non-permanent seat alongside Pakistan.

“Australia will continue to be a strong advocate for human rights, interfaith harmony and for the rights of women and girls in Pakistan and play an active role in providing for basic human rights including education and health assistance for some of Pakistan’s most remote and marginalised communities,” Mr Heyward said.

KP Minister for Industries ensures its full support for passage of comprehensive Acid and Burn Crime Bill.

November 20th, 2012

The Workshop conducted by ASF team in Dera Ismail Khan, aimed at sensitising local CSOs, lawyers, doctors, elected representatives, community members to enhance acid violence reporting as ASF knows that many acid attacks go under reported in Dera Ismail Khan. Additionally, the network support for the passage of comprehensive Acid and Burn crime bill was strenghtened, let us hope for the best in KP!

ASF executive director presenting the comprehensive legislation

KP Minister for industries along with ASF executive Director.

The audience viewing the documentary: Bushra Survives

Advocacy And Lobbying Workhsop In Lahore: 3 Parliamentarians Agree To Table the Comprehensive Acid And Burn Crime Bill In Punjab Provincial Assembly.

October 3rd, 2012

The consultation was organised in collaboration with Mumkin Alliance, Aurat Foundation, MDM, UK Aid, UN Women.

Survivors, agents of change explaining their hurdle and why this comprehensive legislation is necessary.

Improving governance: when elected representatives commit to protect their constituency interest

Coming Along On An ASF Monitoring Field Visit in Southern Punjab.

May 27th, 2012

Mr Stephane Mund, Deputy Head of Mission, Belgium embassy in Pakistan accompanied Mr Mohammad Khan, ASF-Pakistan ED, on a monitoring mission. This was a tangible way of understanding the field situation and observe ASF work on the ground. Mr Mund is shown below being introduced  to the Aman comittee, a group set up to enhance peace between shias and sunnis and prevent conflicts which may lead to extreme violence including acid attack, although the usage of acid from a religious group to target another is still marginal in Pakistan….We salute the initiative!

A great event to celebrate Pakistani-Franco-British synergy!

May 20th, 2012

ASF Protocol youth team ready to welcome the guests!

Mavesh and Nazeeran, happy to be there!

Everything structured, registration desk operational!

ASF team and Interplast UK team devising for great work

ASF Executive Director welcoming the guests

ASF chairperson valerie Khan Yusufzai, Dr Charles Viva and Uk Aid representative

Senator Richard Yung, who proposed ASF project " Ambulance of Hope"to the French Senate

ASF management/advisory team along with Mr Philippe Thiebaut, french ambassador to Pakistan

Mr Philippe Thiebaut, French ambassador to Pakistan offering and presenting the ambulance of hope to Pakistani acid attack survivors.

Distributing awards to interplast team: ASF ED and UK aid representative.

Interplast UK team, delighted with the awards.

A different perspective…The National, Adnan Khan.

May 12th, 2012

The real miracle workers fighting, and healing, Pakistan’s acid attacks

Adnan Khan

Apr 21, 2012

While Saving Face, a documentary on doctors helping Pakistan’s acid attack victims, recently won an Oscar, Adnan Khan discovers a much better story, featuring legitimate heroes who, unlauded, work every day to enable the afflicted to return to society with confidence

It’s odd how the faint sound of sobbing rising up from the crumpled blanket seems to dominate the room. Considering the laughter that is otherwise the mainstay of the women living at the Acid Survivors Foundation (ASF), the tears feel out of place. Rukhsana, knitting a blanket for her newborn son; Nusrat Parveen, busy on the sewing machine; Mumtaz and her 7-year old son, Mozam, giggling over a game they have just invented – these should set the tone in their communal living space.

But it’s Naziran Bibi’s tears that overwhelm all else. “Please, sister,” Nusrat says to her suffering friend. “It will get better. You must be patient.”

The women at ASF are accustomed to this sort of thing. They’ve all been through it themselves: the shock of having their faces melted by acid, the hopelessness that comes from having to then face themselves in the mirror. It is often too much to bear. Naziran is, in this sense, perhaps luckier than some – her attacker managed to blind her completely. But it’s also in that darkness where she now finds herself that her loneliness is absolute.

This is perhaps the most difficult struggle victims of acid attacks face. In a single, cruel stroke, they are transformed into outcasts, their lives relegated to the margins, condemned to a perpetually cloistered existence, shunned by the people around them. It was this same loneliness that ultimately drove Fakhra Younus, a Pakistani acid attack survivor in Italy, to take her own life on March 17.

Her neighbour, Haji Ali Din, reportedly told the Italian media that he had seen Younus an hour before she jumped from her sixth-storey apartment. She was crying, he said, but he dismissed it as a “daily occurrence”.

The pain behind those tears cannot be trivialised simply because of their regularity. Quite the opposite, in fact: that Younus still cried every day after more than a decade (her attack happened in 2000) is a testament to the depth of her suffering. It was the kind of pain that required solace, and the kind of solace that only the company of those who understood her plight could bring.

In Pakistan, there is no shortage of women who are suffering the way Younus did. Their struggles were broadcast to millions around the world after the short documentary Saving Face was awarded an Oscar on February 26. The co-directors of that film, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and Daniel Junge, along with the film’s main character, Dr Mohammad Jawad, became instant media darlings, credited with lifting the veil from one of Pakistan’s most gruesome realities.

But Younus’s death did something else that hasn’t been reported in the world’s media: it drove home the point that acid survivors require more than medical treatment to ensure their well-being; modern medicine can do only so much to make them whole again. More importantly, it’s the psychological damage they have experienced that will be their true lifelong burden.

In the years since Younus’s attack, much has changed in Pakistan to help ease the pain of acid survivors. Saving Face was a timely story insofar as it highlighted some of the work being done to help these women. It was also a heavily dramatised and misleading story, however, relying on old and tired clichés to draw in a western audience.

To read the rest of the article, click the following link…

http://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/film/the-real-miracle-workers-fighting-and-healing-pakistans-acid-attacks

Cooperation Between ASF-Pakistan, ASTI And UN WOMEN…

February 28th, 2012

Pakistan’s First Oscar Win Explores Efforts to End Acid Violence in Pakistan

This year’s Best Short Documentary category at the Academy Awards has honoured a film from Pakistan about acid violence. Saving Face by directors Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy and Daniel Junge, follows the work of a British-Pakistani surgeon with the Acid Survivor Foundation (ASF), to provide free surgical services and support to victims of acid attacks.  It also explores the holistic ways in which ASF-Pakistan has been working to empower Pakistani women and eradicate acid violence with the support of UN Women, among other partners and donors.

In addition to its rehabilitation services, ASF-Pakistan lobbies for acid and burn legislation. The organization was actively involved in consultations, facilitated by a number of international partners, including UN Women, in the drafting of three laws on the issue. The first of these was unanimously passed and enacted in December 2011, and acid-throwing is now a crime against the state, punishable with a fine of one million rupees and a sentence from 14-years to life imprisonment.

Ending violence against women is one of the global priority areas of UN Women and the UN System, and the organization has long supported efforts towards eradicating it, which includes acid violence. In Cambodia, for example, work by Acid Survivors Trust Internationala grantee of the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women – supports local organizations that work with burn survivors, and also lobbies for legislation and implementation at national and international levels.

The Oscar win for Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy and her team, provides a dynamic platform and boost to the on-going national efforts  to have the Acid and Burn Crime Bill 2012 passed and implemented in Pakistan’s Provincial assemblies.