Posts Tagged ‘media’

Regional Glance…

January 16th, 2014
India lags behind Bangladesh and Pakistan on acid attack laws
Dec 6, 2013 07:31 PM , By Anita joshua
Bangladesh was one of the first countries to legislate on acid attacks with the enactment of the Acid Control Act in 2002. File Photo: B. Jothi Ramalingam

Bangladesh was one of the first countries to legislate on acid attacks with the enactment of the Acid Control Act in 2002. File Photo: B. Jothi Ramalingam

The Supreme Court directive earlier this week to all States and Union Territories to put in place draft rules to regulate the sale of acid by this fiscal-end has once again brought to light India’s sluggishness in addressing acid crime.

In fact, India has long lagged behind first Bangladesh and then Pakistan in specifically criminalising acid attacks. It was only earlier this year that the Centre — on Supreme Court’s prodding — amended the criminal law to punish perpetrators of acid attacks with 10-year imprisonment.

This contrasts sharply with neighbouring Bangladesh and somewhat even with Pakistan. Bangladesh has had an acid law for over a decade now and is often flagged as exemplary in this regard. In fact, it was one of the first countries to legislate on acid attacks with the enactment of the Acid Control Act in 2002. Under the Act, the unlicensed production, import, transport, storage, sale and use of acid was made punishable with a prison sentence of three to 10 years.

In the sub-continent, Pakistan came a distant second in putting in place the legal instruments to specifically deal with acid attacks. The penal code and the criminal procedure code were amended in 2011 to provide maximum of life imprisonment for perpetrators of acid attacks. But, as is the case in India, Pakistani provinces are yet to legislate to regulate the sale of acid and other corrosive substances.

3rd Media Training on Effective Reporting On Acid Violence, Lahore 29th September 2012

October 3rd, 2012
In collaboration with UK Aid, UN Women.

Media exploring further the phenomenon of acid violence and its reality in Pakistan

2nd media training on effective reporting of acid and burn violence and promotion of comprehensive acid and burn crime bill.

August 28th, 2012

Press Training in Peshawar in collaboration with UN Women and UK Aid

Interactive methodology

survivors sharing their stories

Zaigham Khan, WS facilitator, talking to TV channels

Distribution of certificates to participants.

News On Implementation: Questions, Debate, Media Reports Are Enhancing The Legal Awareness Process.

January 23rd, 2012

Acid Control Bill: Alleged acid attacker narrowly escapes new law

Published: December 18, 2011

An FIR will be registered against the accused but under the existing law, says SSP.

HYDERABAD: While presidential approval looms over the landmark Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill 2010, the man who threw acid on a woman in Mirpurkhas on Saturday, it turns out, will not be charged under the new law.

Thirty-year-old Mumtaz Dal, mother of four, had acid thrown at her, outside her residence in Junejo quarters, by a man she identified as Sabir Punjabi. Dal alleged that Punjabi attacked her when she rejected his suggestion that the two engage in a physical relationship.

“He came armed with a gun,” Dal told her doctors, the police and media at the Civil Hospital in Mirpurkhas where she was shifted immediately after the incident. The hospital, however, does not have a burns unit.

An FIR will be registered against the accused, but under the existing law, Mirpurkhas SSP Muhammad Riaz Soomro said, adding, “We have not been notified about the new law yet.”

On December 12, the Senate approved the historic bill along with the Prevention of Anti-Women Practices Bill, seven months after it was passed by the National Assembly in May. The bill in question penalises a convict with at least fourteen years of imprisonment and a minimum fine of Rs1 million.

The existing laws, however, impose a less severe punishment. A gender-crime of this nature will barely sentence one anywhere between seven and eight years of imprisonment under Section 337 of the Pakistan Penal Code, according to Hamad Ali Shah, a legal aid of the Women’s Crisis Centre.

“The jail term will be lesser if the victim’s face and vital body parts survive the attack,” he said while speaking to The Express Tribune. Shah said the lacunae in the applicable law also gives leverage to a medico legal officer to tamper with the medical report in order to make the offence less punishable.

The victim’s face was not damaged in the attack, SSP Soomro said, adding that the police were conducting raids to arrest the culprit. “Once the FIR is lodged, we will investigate the case on merit,” he said. Soomro said that the police were also looking into the alleged relationship between Punjabi and Dal.

The medico legal officer’s report is yet to be released.

(With additional reporting by Afaque Ahmed in Mirpurkhas)

Published in The Express Tribune, December 18th, 2011.

Saving Faces Gets Preselected For Oscar Nomination: Let Us Keep Our Fingers Crossed!

October 19th, 2011

Charmaine Obayd Chinoy and Daniel Junge directing the movie SAVING FACES which features Dr Jawad’s role and ASF rehabilitation, advoccay and lobbying work, good news, good surprises, let us see the future scenario…!

The Media Marathon To Higlight The International Dimension Of Acid Violence And The Urge To Pass Laws To Eradicate It!

November 4th, 2010

http://www.france24.com/fr/20101027-focus-pakistan-femmes-brulees-acide-violences-conjugales-justice

http://www.france-info.com/chroniques-dossier-du-jour-2010-10-26-brulee-a-l-acide-un-temoignage-sur-les-violences-faites-aux-femmes-au-493565-14-17.html

http://www.tv5.org/TV5Site/webtv/video-7960-Pakistan_les_femmes_brulees_a_l_acide_sulfurique.htm

Warning…

June 4th, 2010

Acid Survivors Foundation can only guarantee the relevance of its data and the ones stated in ASF statistics but does not give any guarantee of any kind for whatever is published in various articles, books, magasines, etc… as :

- mistakes do occur frequently in the journalists statements

- some organisations do not necessarily follow a protocol of verification and liaison for notification/identification/tracing of acid attacks, do not necessary have reliable sources of information.

The figures of 8886 acid survivors since 1994 in Pakistan, is not an information that we will validate for the time being as it does not correspond to any data we came across so far. If any such new data is available, we would study it and of course would uodate ours accordingly and disseminate the information,

VKY, ASF Chairperson.

Acid attack spreading…

May 7th, 2010

Page last updated at 08:38 GMT, Friday, 30 April 2010 09:38 UK

Acid attack on Pakistani sisters in Balochistan

Manzoor Attiqa (pictured) was attacked earlier this year

Campaigners there are up to 150 acid attacks every year

Three sisters have suffered serious facial burns after two unidentified men on a motorbike threw acid at them in Pakistan’s Balochistan province.

The sisters, aged between 14 and 20 years old, were attacked as they walked from Kalat city to Pandarani village – one is still in a serious condition.

Political activists held a protest in Kalat shortly after the attack.

There are no reliable statistics, but campaigners say there may be 150 acid attack victims in Pakistan each year.

The police named the girls as Fatima Bibi, 20, Saima Bibi, 16 and Sakina Bibi, 14.

They were taken to a government hospital in Kalat, but Fatima Bibi was later shifted to a hospital in the provincial capital, Quetta.

No arrests have been made as yet.

Two weeks ago, an unknown group – the Baloch Ghairatmand Group (the Honourable Baloch Group) – claimed responsibility for a similar attack on two women in a market in Dalbandin city.

The group had warned women to wear the hijab, the traditional Muslim headscarf, and not to visit markets unaccompanied by men from their families.

The attack was criticised by Balochistan’s political leaders as well as armed rebel groups, who said it had been carried out by elements that wanted to push the Baloch people back in time.