Posts Tagged ‘implementation’

ASF and AUS AID joining hands for more effective law implementation

October 7th, 2013

Training lawyers in Quetta on criminal law amendment act XXV, 2011

medico-legal staff joining the 2nd training

Article In Dawn.Com

July 3rd, 2012

Need to implement pro-women laws’

From the Newspaper | | 28th June, 2012
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LAHORE, June 27: Participants in a seminar have urged the government and the civil society to make joint efforts to ensure implementation of pro-women laws in letter and spirit.

The seminar on ‘Law enforcement for pro-women legislation and the Domestic Violence Bill’ was arranged by Mumkin, an alliance of 18 civil society organisations, at a local hotel on Wednesday.

Chief Minister’s Adviser Begum Zakia Shahnawaz said the attitude of the society towards domestic violence was deplorable as it was considered a family matter in which the law and state should not intervene.

Some 610 incidents of domestic violence were reported and around 10,000 women were identified as victims of violence or forced marriage in the country, she said and added that it was the responsibility of the state to protect its population, especially the most vulnerable segments like women, elderly people and children, and to punish perpetrators.

Ms Shahnawaz said the Punjab government was encouraging the pro-women legislation and would effectively implement the Domestic Violence Bill after its passage from the provincial assembly after which such issues would be addressed amicably in Punjab and no-one would dare to torture the vulnerable people.

Human Rights Commission of Pakistan General Secretary I.A Rehman said the government should be persuaded to implement in letter and spirit all laws in general and those pertaining to vulnerable segment of society in particular.

He said that it was the duty of the civil society to see how many cases were reported and how many were in courts.

Hina Hafeezullah Ishaq of Nasreen Trust explained various clauses of the draft domestic violence bill and its provisions, punishments and central demand for survivors of violence.

She urged the government to take proper action to protect vulnerable persons irrespective of gender.

Acid Survivor Foundation President Valerie Khan stressed the need to adopt law enforcement mechanisms for the pro-women legislation.

Vulnerable persons, especially women, had been facing a lot of problems to get cases registered in the police station concerned, she said.

Punjab Bar Council president Rana Muhammad Asif Saeed highlighted various sections of the Pakistan Penal Code regarding family disputes and domestic violence issues.

Social Welfare and Baitul Maal Secretary Sardar Akram Javeed spoke about the measures taken by the government for the betterment of women victims of violence.

He specifically mentioned the 35 shelter homes in Punjab where some 10,000 or so victims were accommodated free of cost annually.

Mumkin advocacy manager Summiya Yousaf said that 6,188 cases of violence against women had been reported in Punjab in 2011.

The passage of the Domestic Violence Bill and its implementation should remain key challenges and the Punjab government should be the model province for women rights.

News On Implementation: Questions, Debate, Media Reports Are Enhancing The Legal Awareness Process.

January 23rd, 2012

Acid Control Bill: Alleged acid attacker narrowly escapes new law

Published: December 18, 2011

An FIR will be registered against the accused but under the existing law, says SSP.

HYDERABAD: While presidential approval looms over the landmark Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill 2010, the man who threw acid on a woman in Mirpurkhas on Saturday, it turns out, will not be charged under the new law.

Thirty-year-old Mumtaz Dal, mother of four, had acid thrown at her, outside her residence in Junejo quarters, by a man she identified as Sabir Punjabi. Dal alleged that Punjabi attacked her when she rejected his suggestion that the two engage in a physical relationship.

“He came armed with a gun,” Dal told her doctors, the police and media at the Civil Hospital in Mirpurkhas where she was shifted immediately after the incident. The hospital, however, does not have a burns unit.

An FIR will be registered against the accused, but under the existing law, Mirpurkhas SSP Muhammad Riaz Soomro said, adding, “We have not been notified about the new law yet.”

On December 12, the Senate approved the historic bill along with the Prevention of Anti-Women Practices Bill, seven months after it was passed by the National Assembly in May. The bill in question penalises a convict with at least fourteen years of imprisonment and a minimum fine of Rs1 million.

The existing laws, however, impose a less severe punishment. A gender-crime of this nature will barely sentence one anywhere between seven and eight years of imprisonment under Section 337 of the Pakistan Penal Code, according to Hamad Ali Shah, a legal aid of the Women’s Crisis Centre.

“The jail term will be lesser if the victim’s face and vital body parts survive the attack,” he said while speaking to The Express Tribune. Shah said the lacunae in the applicable law also gives leverage to a medico legal officer to tamper with the medical report in order to make the offence less punishable.

The victim’s face was not damaged in the attack, SSP Soomro said, adding that the police were conducting raids to arrest the culprit. “Once the FIR is lodged, we will investigate the case on merit,” he said. Soomro said that the police were also looking into the alleged relationship between Punjabi and Dal.

The medico legal officer’s report is yet to be released.

(With additional reporting by Afaque Ahmed in Mirpurkhas)

Published in The Express Tribune, December 18th, 2011.