Posts Tagged ‘gender justice’

Acid Attacks Convictions Triple From 2011 Till 2012: From 6% till 18% Conviction Rate.

March 18th, 2013

Our conclusion? good but insufficient, can do much better!!!

Please check on this link  (copy paste) and watch the video, join us to continue our efforts…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ByigOo2Him

Baroness Northover visiting ASF-Pakistan Nursing Care and Rehabilitation Unit.

March 18th, 2013

With ASF team

Looking at photos and checking"before" and "after"

Saving Face Wins Oscar!!! Well Done Pakistani Women!

February 27th, 2012

Pakistani journalist and documentarian Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy’s latest venture Saving Face has won an Oscar award under the category ‘Best Documentary, Short Subject’.

In her acceptance speech, Chinoy dedicated the award to “all the heroes working on the ground in Pakistan” including British Pakistani plastic surgeon Dr Mohammad Jawad, main subjects of the documentary and the women of Pakistan.

“All the women in Pakistan working for change, don’t give up on your dreams, this is for you,” she said.

Dedicating the award to main subjects Rukhsana and Zakia, Obaid-Chinoy said that their “resilience and bravery in the face of such adversary is admirable”.

Co-director Daniel Junge said he had the idea for the film after hearing about Jawad, and asked Chinoy to work with him. He has been previously nominated for an both an Oscar and an Emmy.

“To win … and with such a http://i1.tribune.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/342358-sharmeenobaidreuters-1330317111-941-640x480.jpgsubject – it’s such an honour,” he said.

The documentary Saving Face chronicles the work of Dr Jawad, who performed reconstructive surgery on survivors of acid attacks in Pakistan.

The documentary, which is filmed across Islamabad, Rawalpindi and the small towns of Punjab, was released in the US in November. It is due to release in the UK in March 2012, following which it will be released in Pakistan.

“The women who decided to be a part of the documentary did so because they wanted to make their voices heard and wanted to bring attention to this form of assault,” Chinoy said in an interview conducted before she won the Oscar.

“The main reason that they are in Saving Face is to make their stories heard and have an impact.” Many victims are women attacked by their husbands, and others assaulted for turning down a proposal of marriage. One girl in the documentary describes how she was burned after rejecting the advances of her teacher. She was 13 at the time.

Another woman featured in the film is 25-year-old Rukhsana, whose husband threw acid on her and her sister-in-law doused her in gasoline before her mother-in-law lit a match and set her on fire.

Chinoy said she hopes the cases in her film will resonate for others in Pakistan.

“It is a story of hope with a powerful message for the Pakistani audience. I felt this would be a great way to show how Pakistanis can help other Pakistanis overcome their problems,” she said.

Chinoy’s films have won international acclaim. Her 2010 documentary, Pakistan’s Taliban Generation, won an International Emmy Award.

At the ceremony, Obaid-Chinoy chose to wear female designers, from her clothes and her jewellery.

“I am wearing Bunto Kazmi for the ceremony and will be wearing Sana Safinaz and Saniya Maskatiya for Oscar-related events. My jewellery will be done by Kiran Aman of Kiran Fine Jewellery and Sherezad Rahimtoola of Labels. I am really excited to showcase local Pakistani talent, and that too all women,” revealed Chinoy.

Link:  http://tribune.com.pk/story/342358/sharmeen-obaid-chinoys-documentary-wins-oscar-for-best-documentary-short-subject/

Celebrating 12th February 2012: National Woman Day Along With National Commission On The Status Of Women And Ministry Of Human Rights, EVAWG Alliance And Schola Nova.

February 20th, 2012

Schola Nova Students Council team volunteering to celebrate Pakistani National Women Day.

The Burning truth program of Acid Survivors Foundation Pakistan has always made sure that we would include youth turned into agents of change, and thus, promote the volunteers who will be in charge of generating systemic change and promote human rights. Here they are along with Valerie Khan, ASF chairperson.

Congratulations, Pakistan is proud of them!

Henna Safdar, ASF project manager with a few volunteers: good work!

The 3 Days That Changed Everything For Acid Survivors…

December 17th, 2011

Pakistani civil society in front of the Parliament a few minutes before the senate session started...

Presenting the acid violence phenomenon and the extent of anti-women practices to the Deputy Chairman of the senate with Dr Fouzia Saeed

Last technical briefing, Senator Nilofar Bakhtyar all set!

Acid Survivors, and the civil society, a few minutes before entering the senate

Acid Survivors Foundation survivors present at UN women report launch :In pursuit of Justice.

August 9th, 2011

“Progress of the World’s Women 2011-2012: In Pursuit of Justice”‏ by UN Women.

By Myra Imran

Raising numerous serious questions regarding lacunas in the prevalent justice systems around the world, the UN Women launched its first major report titled ‘Progress of the World’s Women 2011-2012 — In Pursuit of Justice’ in Pakistan on Friday.

Presenting a comparative analysis of global statistics, the first major report following the organisation’s launch in early 2011, mentions that justice remains out of the reach of millions of the world’s women. It says Domestic violence is outlawed in 125 countries of the world but globally, 603 million women live in countries where domestic violence is not considered a crime.

Laws based on custom or religion, which exist alongside state legislation, frequently restrict women’s rights within the family, in marriage, divorce and the right to inherit property. “Much has been achieved in the private and public spheres in the last century. Yet discrimination and gender injustice remain prevalent around the world.”

The report says that 117 countries have equal pay laws yet, in practice, women are still paid up to 30 per cent less than men in some countries and women still do more unpaid domestic and caring work than men in every region of the world.

It points out that globally, 53 per cent of working women — 600 million in total — are in vulnerable jobs, such as self-employment, domestic work or unpaid work for family businesses, which often lack the protection of labour laws.

Highlighting another such dimension, the report says that by 2011, at least 52 countries had made marital rape a criminal offence. And yet, over 2.6 billion women live in countries where it has not been explicitly criminalized.

It mentions that in countries where there have been steep increases in women’s representation in Parliaments, progressive laws on women’s rights have often followed yet there are still less than 30 per cent of women in parliament in the vast majority of countries. It further mentions that donors spend US$4.2 billion annually on aid for justice reform, but only 5 per cent of this spending specifically targets women and girls.

The report also recognises the positive progress made and says that 139 countries and territories now guarantee gender equality in their constitutions but it also shows that too often, women continue to experience injustice, violence and inequality in their home and working lives.

To ensure justice becomes a reality for all women, UN Women calls on governments to repeal laws that discriminate against women, support innovative justice services, put women on the frontline of justice delivery and invest in justice system that can respond to women’s need.

It stresses the need to ensure that legislation protects women from violence and inequality in the home and the workplace and demands innovative justice services such as one-stop shops, legal aid and specialised courts, to ensure women can access the justice to which they are entitled.

The report says that across the board, existing laws are too often inadequately enforced, the report finds. Many women shrink away from reporting crimes due to social stigma and weak justice systems. The costs and practical difficulties of seeking justice can be prohibitive — from travel to a distant court, to paying for expensive legal advice. The result is high drop-out rates in cases where women seek redress, especially on gender-based violence.

The thought provoking and colourful launching of report was attended by a large number of women right activists, representatives of civil society organisations, lawyer’s associations and law enforcing agencies. Speaker National Assembly Dr Fehmida Mirza was the chief guest on the occasion.

Others who spoke at the event included Federal Ombudsperson for Harassment Act Mussarat Hilali, President Lawyers for Human Rights Zia Awan, AIG Islamabad Ehsan Sadiq and Country Director UN Women Alice Shakleford.

The speakers stressed the need for collaborative efforts to create an enabling environment for women in pursuit justice. They pointed out that enough legislation has been formulated in Pakistan for women in past few decades but the real issue is the effective implementation of these laws. They also demanded elimination of discriminatory laws.

Besides formal speeches made by the guests, the event included an interactive session with the stakeholders and poetry recitation by UN Gender Expert Salman Asif who read some of the very fine verses by eminent social worker Bilqees Edhi urging everyone to feel for women in distress and help them.

Another unique feature was the audio of inspiring stories of women survivors played for the guests. These women faced extreme forms of violence against women but were brave enough to fight back and become a role model for others.

Speaker Dr Fehmida Mirza said that no system can claim to be democratic and participatory if it fails to include and address the issues concerning its women. She said that women’s pursuit for justice stretches back beyond recorded time to the myths and legends told by ancient seers in all cultures and civilisations.

“Societies were always hesitant in accepting them on a par with their men. It is high time that we make our society realize that gender roles, inequities and power imbalances are not a ‘natural’ result of biological differences, but determined by the systems and cultures in which we live.”

She highlighted the efforts of Pakistan People’s Part to bring women in the lime light at every level. She said that in the last three years of its 5-year tenure, the women Parliamentarians ran 60 per cent of the business in the National Assembly and the government has passed 77 bills in which more than a dozen relate to women and children.

“Laws hold a critical balance in shaping societies although they alone cannot bring a change in mindsets. No government, no matter how democratic in nature, can bring about a revolution on its own if it is not backed by a strong and committed public opinion,” she opined.

She said that Pakistan will hold the seventh meeting of the Women Speakers of Parliaments around the world in November this year, where the women speakers will focus on making parliaments more gender sensitive. At the Saarc Speakers Conference in Delhi, she has also proposed the creation of a Saarc Parliament which could allow the Parliamentarians of the region to jointly address issues of social injustice, the speeding up of the MDGs and the realization of an equity-based gender-balanced mutually beneficial Saarc community.

Saturday, July 30, 2011
National Commission on the Status of Women-Pakistan
Government of Pakistan
Phone: +92-51-9224875,9209885
comms@ncsw.gov.pk
www.ncsw.gov.pk

Civil Society Press Statement

May 18th, 2011

Civil Society Calls for a Comprehensive Legislation to Eradicate Acid and Burn Crimes in Pakistan

Islamabad: Civil society organizations have called upon legislators to pass a comprehensive law to eradicate crimes involving acid throwing and other burn attacks and provide support to victims of such crimes. While welcoming an amendment in the Pakistani Penal Code adopted by the National Assembly of Pakistan to enhance the punishment for acid crimes, the civil society has emphasized the need for a more comprehensive legislation for the purpose.

Through a statement issued on May 17, a number of civil society organizations welcomed the amendment as a significant achievement “as it acknowledges the gravity of acid crimes and enhances punishment for acid crimes”. However, they declared that the bill was not enough to eradicate acid crimes from Pakistan. They demanded that in the light of a verdict made by the Supreme Court of Pakistan, the parliament should adopt a comprehensive legislation on the model of the Bangladeshi law.

Pakistani government and law makers need to follow the example of Bangladesh where number of acid throwing incidents, have dropped from 500 a year in 1998 to 60 a year more recently because of effective legislation and improved compliance.

The current amendment does not address the investigation process that often faces delays and is biased against survivors and their families. There is a need to make investigation and police officer accountable and ensure protection to victims and witnesses through law. Length of trial also needs to be fixed and accountability should be set in case of an unfair trial.

There is strong need for an authority or a forum to support victims in medical treatment, socio-economic rehabilitation and legal support, besides collecting and maintaining data and establishing an appropriate surveillance/funding system that could facilitate implementation, awareness and preventive steps.

The civil society calls for early legislation of the proposed Acid and Burn Crimes Act 2011 that was drafted in light of the order of  the Supreme Court of  Pakistan after extensive process of  stakeholders’ consultation involving civil-society, legal and medical experts, local communities, law enforcement agencies, international organisations, media and survivors.

ACtive and committed to generate sustainable change and eradicate acid and burn crimes in Pakistan.

Acid Survivors Foundation Now Asking Provincial Assemblies To Support Acid And Burn Crime Act 2011.

April 11th, 2011

Participants in the seminar held on 30th March 2011in Karachi: civil society, media, lecetd representatives, lawyers.

ASF Executive Director , Mohammad Khan, welcoming the crowd and requesting Sidh porvincila assembly to lead the way in passing the Acid and Burn Crime Act 2011.

Advocate Hasan Akbar terming acid crime a crime against humanity.

Sindh Minister for Women Development , Mrs Tauqeer Fatima Bhutto, ensuring ASF of her support to promote women and girls rights and support gender justice.

3rd consultation: Acid Crime And Prevention Bill!

September 14th, 2010

ASF team proposing the new law on acid to ministry of women development with the support of UNIFEM and NCSW

Naveed Khan, legal consultant, presenting the law before q/a session.

Yasmeen Rehman, advisor to the Prime Minister on Women Affairs was tehre to host the consultation and officialise the government will to eradicate acid violence.

Strong supporters of gender justice : Fahmida Iqbal and Dr fauzia Saeed from NCSW.

Hands up for the press, as usual, our Pakistani fellows were there to support ASF cause!

These pictures are highly encouraging and ASF applauds Ministry of Women Development and National Commission on The Status of Women for commiting to propose a law in the Parliament. But more efforts are needed, we are on the right path but the journey is not over! ASF is determined to bring a sustainable change to stop a non human phenomenon,  major human rights breach, for this, we will need your support, get ready!

2nd Consultation On Acid Crime And Prevention Bill Through Photos.

July 26th, 2010

Dr Fauzia Saeed from The national Commission on The Status of Women

Sana recalling Naila's fight for justice and the historical decision of the Chief Justice of Pakistan.

Fahmida Iqbal from UNIFEM recalling the CEDAW guidelines before critically reviewing the outline of the new bill.

lawyers at work!

Survivors also present to say what they want!

Justice Nasira Iqbal expressing her views and demanding a law against acid violence.